Friday, March 25, 2016

Arcus Senilis

Often patients have noticed that their dark brown eyes are changing to blue at the edge. This is not actually the eye changing color, but a condition called arcus. The color of the eye comes from the pigment in the iris. This blue color is actually white cholesterol depositing in the cornea that looks blue when superimposed in front of the brown iris.

While this is very common in elderly patients, if seen in a younger patient, it should be a sign to have your cholesterol level checked. The cholesterol deposition in the cornea does not hamper vision because it is in the peripheral cornea rather than the central cornea, but it indicates cholesterol may be depositing elsewhere in the body, where it can have detrimental effects on health.

There are no other symptoms of this condition other than the ring that forms around the corneal periphery. This condition is painless and presents no further health risks for people over the age of 70. If this occurs in people under they age of 40, they could have other medical issues such as hypercholesterolemia, which is high levels of cholesterol in the blood.

If you or a loved one are experiencing this, you should consult your eye care professional and go in to get checked out.

 

corneal_arcus_eye_photo-resized-600

 

From the eye doctors, opticians and staff at Rinkov Eyecare Centers. We’ve provided comprehensive eye exams, contact lenses, eyeglasses, sunglasses and medical treatment of eye disease, such as cataract treatment, in Columbus, Ohio for over 35 years. Come see an optometrist at one of our convenient Columbus locations – Downtown, West, East, Westerville, Dublin, Bexley, Worthington, Nationwide Plaza, and now open in Hilliard!

Friday, March 18, 2016

Spring Is Here!

It’s that time of the year. The sun is out. The bees are buzzing (sort of http://sos-bees.org/). Lawnmowers are coming out of hibernation. The boots are being put in the back of the closet to make room for flip-flops and sneakers.

Spring has finally sprung.

It sounds great. Unless you’re one of the millions of people who suffer from seasonal allergies, then it can be a real pain in the eye.

Luckily, there are steps you can take to make sure you are fully prepared to get outside, enjoy the sunshine and smell the flowers.

The first step to managing your allergies is understanding what is causing them. The change in the seasons causes all sorts of allergy-inducing things to be floating around the air. The most common cause of seasonal allergies is pollen from grasses, weeds and trees.

The most common eye allergy symptoms are:

  • Red, irritated eyes

  • Itchiness

  • Tearing or runny eyes

  • Swollen eyelids

  • Soreness, burning, or pain

  • Sensitivity to light


If you suffer from any of these symptoms, don’t worry; there are very easy ways to relieve them. Many over-the-counter types of anti-histamine will help relieve your symptoms almost immediately. These medications work to block the histamines that are causing your discomfort. A number of different kinds of eye drops will give you instant relief as well.

Other ways to reduce the discomfort of seasonal allergies without the use of medications are:

  • Wear sunglasses when you go outside. They'll block some of the pollen and other outdoor allergens from getting into your eyes.

  • Rinse your eyes with water or apply a cold, wet washcloth.

  • Take out your contact lenses.

  • Don’t rub your eyes, no matter how much they itch. It will only make the irritation worse


Don’t bee afraid of allergy season, start enjoying the weather!

 

bee-on-yellow-lrg

 

From the eye doctors, opticians and staff at Rinkov Eyecare Centers. We’ve provided comprehensive eye exams, contact lenses, eyeglasses, sunglasses and medical treatment of eye disease, such as cataract treatment, in Columbus, Ohio for over 35 years. Come see an optometrist at one of our convenient Columbus locations – Downtown, West, East, Westerville, Dublin, Bexley, Worthington, Nationwide Plaza, and now open in Hilliard!

Friday, March 11, 2016

Rods and Cones

Today we are going to be talking about Rods and Cones. No, not the ones you use for fishing and traffic detours. We are talking about the photoreceptors in your retina!

Rods are responsible for vision in low light. They are able to track motion and make out shapes, but they do not help with seeing color. There are approximately 120 million rods in the human eye!

The Rods are very sensitive to light, that’s why it is difficult to keep your eyes open when you turn on a light after being in the dark. Think about that next time you’re a room without the lights on!

Cones are responsible for seeing color and perform best in very high light situations.

There are three different types of cones:

  • Short-wavelength sensitive cones

  • Middle-wavelength sensitive cones

  • Long-wavelength sensitive cones


The various types of cones are responsible for seeing different types of colors. The cones are also used to detect detail in objects. Like how the “b” in the previous sentence is just a tad bigger than the rest of the letters on this page!

Now you know, rods and cones aren’t just for fishing and traffic detours!

Eye Rods and Cones

From the eye doctors, opticians and staff at Rinkov Eyecare Centers. We’ve provided comprehensive eye exams, contact lenses, eyeglasses, sunglasses and medical treatment of eye disease, such as cataract treatment, in Columbus, Ohio for over 35 years. Come see an optometrist at one of our convenient Columbus locations – Downtown, West, East, Westerville, Dublin, Bexley, Worthington, Nationwide Plaza, and now open in Hilliard!

Friday, March 4, 2016

Why do onions make you cry?

We have all been there. Just hanging out in the kitchen while Mom’s cooking dinner and out of nowhere there are tears running down your face. Are you sad? No. Are you laughing too hard? Probably not. At the peak of your confusion you happen to look to your left and see Mom over there cutting up an onion and suddenly it all makes sense.

But then you think, “Why the heck is this thing making me cry?” Well, you’re about to find out.

Onioncrying-onions are part of the Allium species of plants, which have a tendency to absorb sulfur from the soil. When an onion is cut into, enzymes are released and they react with the sulfur to create amino acid sulfoxides.

The chemical reaction creates syn-propanethial-S-oxide, which is a combination of sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide. When the gasses from this substance come in contact with the fluid in your eye they cause the burning sensation that you feel when hanging out around freshly cut onions.

The burning sensation then causes the eye to naturally produce tears in order to relieve the discomfort that your eye is feeling.

So, next time you’re around some freshly cut onions, be sure to tell everyone what is actually going on.

 

From the eye doctors, opticians and staff at Rinkov Eyecare Centers. We’ve provided comprehensive eye exams, contact lenses, eyeglasses, sunglasses and medical treatment of eye disease, such as cataract treatment, in Columbus, Ohio for over 35 years. Come see an optometrist at one of our convenient Columbus locations – Downtown, West, East, Westerville, Dublin, Bexley, Worthington, Nationwide Plaza, and now open in Hilliard!