Friday, February 26, 2016

How The Eye Works

The human eye is an incredible thing. Take a second to think about how cool your eyes actually are. They can see things that are right in front of you or miles away and they can switch between the two almost instantly.

The average eyeball is about the same size as a ping pong ball. There are 20 working parts in your eye, which sounds like a lot, but considering everything it does it really isn’t that many.

The eye works like this:

  • Light enters the cornea, the clear front surface of the eye.

  • The light then travels through the Iris, which controls the amount of light that reaches the back of the eye by adjusting the size of the pupil.

  • The Crystalline Lens, located directly behind the pupil, further focuses the light through a process called accommodation, which helps the eye focus on its subject.

  • Focused light then reaches the Retina, the inner lining of the back of the eye. The Retina converts images into electronic signals that are sent to the Optic Nerve and then gets sent to the Visual Cortex of the brain.


The eye does all of those things faster than you even realize what is happening. So again, take a minute to really think about how awesome the eye is. Now go out and see all the cool things your eyes were made to see!

 

anatomy-eye-24992479

 

From the eye doctors, opticians and staff at Rinkov Eyecare Centers. We’ve provided comprehensive eye exams, contact lenses, eyeglasses, sunglasses and medical treatment of eye disease, such as cataract treatment, in Columbus, Ohio for over 35 years. Come see an optometrist at one of our convenient Columbus locations – Downtown, West, East, Westerville, Dublin, Bexley, Worthington, Nationwide Plaza, and now open in Hilliard!

Friday, February 19, 2016

20/20 Vision... What Does It Really Mean?

You have probably been told your whole life that 20/20 vision is as good as it gets when it comes to eyesight. Most people know the term, but don’t know what it actually means.

20/20 vision is a term used to describe normal visual acuity, or the sharpness and clarity of something at 20 feet. If you have 20/20 vision, an object at 20 feet should look crisp and clear.

Having 20/20 vision doesn’t necessarily mean you have perfect vision. There are other factors that you have to take into account such as depth perception and peripheral vision.

snellen-eye-chart

Vision is typically measured with the use of a Snellen Chart. The combination of numbers and letters vary in size and are used to determine how well you can see objects from a specified distance.

It is important to have your vision tested by an Optometrist or Ophthalmologist. If you feel that your vision is declining, please make an appointment with us and get it checked out.

From the eye doctors, opticians and staff at Rinkov Eyecare Centers. We’ve provided comprehensive eye exams, contact lenses, eyeglasses, sunglasses and medical treatment of eye disease, such as cataract treatment, in Columbus, Ohio for over 35 years. Come see an optometrist at one of our convenient Columbus locations – Downtown, West, East, Westerville, Dublin, Bexley, Worthington, Nationwide Plaza, and now open in Hilliard!

Friday, February 12, 2016

The Monocle: The Impractical Lens

Monocle (noun): a single eyeglass, kept in position by the muscles around the eye.

So, a monocle is basically a half of a pair of glasses that you have to hold in place with your eyebrow? Sounds like it would be a bit too much work. And what about the other eye? Seems a bit impractical to me.

It is that impracticality that made monocles so popular amongst the wealthy aristocrats in the late 1800’s. A proper Monocle had to be custom made and fitted to your eye, which was an extensive and expensive process that only the wealthy could afford. The Monocle was used as a status symbol as a way to show off ones wealth.

The use of a single lens for magnification can be traced back to Ancient Egypt, but the monocle, as we know it, was invented in Germany in the 1700s and was originally called the Eye Ring. It was made popular by an Austrian optics student named J. F. Voigtlander. He began making Monocles in 1814 and selling them to the wealthy.

Monocles would come in and out of style throughout the 1800s and typically were made out of metal, tortoiseshell or horn. Some high-end Monocles were even made out of Gold and Silver. Though, don’t go trading out your eyeglasses for a customized monocle just yet! The Monocle was never considered a functional solution for eye problems, just as a status symbol for the wealthy.

 

monocle man